The online outlet online sale Schopenhauer Cure: A Novel online sale

The online outlet online sale Schopenhauer Cure: A Novel online sale

The online outlet online sale Schopenhauer Cure: A Novel online sale

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From the internationally bestselling author of Love''s Executioner and When Nietzsche Wept, comes a novel of group therapy with a cast of memorably wounded characters struggling to heal pain and change lives

Suddenly confronted with his own mortality after a routine checkup, eminent psychotherapist Julius Hertzfeld is forced to reexamine his life and work -- and seeks out Philip Slate, a sex addict whom he failed to help some twenty years earlier. Yet Philip claims to be cured -- miraculously transformed by the pessimistic teachings of German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer -- and is, himself, a philosophical counselor in training.

Philip''s dour, misanthropic stance compels Julius to invite Philip to join his intensive therapy group in exchange for tutoring on Schopenhauer. But with mere months left, life may be far too short to help Philip or to compete with him for the hearts and minds of the group members. And then again, it might be just long enough.

From Publishers Weekly

Having taken on the origins of psychotherapy in the popular When Nietzsche Wept, psychiatrist-novelist Yalom now turns to group therapy and the thinker sometimes known as the "philosopher of pessimism," in this meticulous, occasionally slow-moving book. Julius Hertzfeld, a successful therapist in San Francisco, is shocked by the news that he suffers from terminal cancer. Moved to reassess his life''s work, he contacts Philip Slate, whose three years of therapy for sexual addiction Julius describes as an "old-time major-league failure." Philip is now training to be a therapist himself, guided by the writings of Arthur Schopenhauer, and he offers to teach Julius about Schopenhauer as a way of helping him deal with his looming death. Julius and Philip strike a deal: Julius will serve as Philip''s clinical supervisor, but only if Philip joins the ongoing therapy group Julius leads. To complicate matters further, Pam, a group member, is one of the hundreds of women Philip seduced and then rejected. Yalom often refers to his books as "teaching novels," and his re-creation of a working therapy group is utterly convincing. At the same time, his approach can be overly documentary, as the inner workings of therapy, often repetitious and self-referential, absorb much of the novel''s momentum. A parallel account of Schopenhauer''s life sheds light on the philosopher''s intellectual triumphs and emotional difficulties.
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Review

“Yalom’s enthusiasm is contagious. And he certainly knows how to tell a page-turning story.” -- Los Angeles Times

“Yalom’s melding of philosophy, pedantry, psychiatry and literature result in a surprisingly engaging novel of ideas.” -- San Francisco Chronicle

“Considers the value and limits of therapy and those points at which philosophy and psychology converge.” -- Washington Post

“A beautifully wrought tale of a therapy group’s final year and a moving debate about the end of life.” -- Kirkus Reviews

“As a novel of ideas, this book effectively explores loss, sexual desire, and the search for meaning.” -- Library Journal

“The world’s first accurate group-therapy novel, a mezmerizing story of two men’s search for meaning.” -- Greensboro News & Record

“Meticulous. [Yalom’s] re-creation of a working therapy group is utterly convincing.” -- Publishers Weekly

From the Back Cover

From novelist and master psychotherapist Irvin Yalom, author of Lying on the Couch and When Nietzsche Wept, comes the world''s first accurate group-therapy novel, a mesmerizing story of two men''s search for meaning.

At one time or another, all of us have wondered what we''d do in the face of death. Suddenly confronted with his own mortality after a routine checkup, distinguished psychotherapist Julius Hertzfeld is forced to reexamine his life and work. Has he really made an enduring difference in the lives of his patients? And what about the patients he''s failed? What has happened to them? Now that he is wiser and riper, can he rescue them yet?

Reaching beyond the safety of his thriving San Francisco practice, Julius feels compelled to seek out Philip Slate, whom he treated for sex addiction some twenty-three years earlier. At that time, Philip''s only means of connecting to humans was through brief sexual interludes with countless women, and Julius''s therapy did not change that. He meets with Philip, who claims to have cured himself -- by reading the pessimistic and misanthropic philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer.

Much to Julius''s surprise, Philip has become a philosophical counselor and requests that Julius provide him with the supervisory hours he needs to obtain a license to practice. In return, Philip offers to tutor Julius in the work of Schopenhauer. Julius hesitates. How can Philip possibly become a therapist? He is still the same arrogant, uncaring, self-absorbed person he had always been. In fact, in every way he resembles his mentor, Schopenhauer. But eventually they strike a Faustian bargain: Julius agrees to supervise Philip, provided that Philip first joins his therapy group. Julius is hoping that six months with the group will address Philip''s misanthropy and that by being part of a circle of fellow patients, he will develop the relationship skills necessary to become a therapist.

Philip enters the group, but he is more interested in educating the members in Schopenhauer''s philosophy -- which he claims is all the therapy anyone should need -- than he is in their individual problems. Soon Julius and Philip, using very different therapeutic approaches, are competing for the hearts and minds of the group members.

Is this going to be Julius''s swan song -- a splintered group and years of good work down the drain? Or will all the members, including Philip, find a way to rise to the occasion that brings with it the potential for extraordinary change? In The Schopenhauer Cure, Irvin Yalom elegantly weaves the true story of Schopenhauer''s psychological life throughout the narrative, knitting together fact and fiction to form a compellingly readable tale.

About the Author

Irvin D. Yalom, M.D., is the author of Love''s Executioner, Momma and the Meaning of Life, Lying on the Couch, The Schopenhauer Cure, When Nietzsche Wept, as well as several classic textbooks on psychotherapy, including The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy, considered the foremost work on group therapy. The Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry at Stanford University, he divides his practice between Palo Alto, where he lives, and San Francisco, California.

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
610 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Kate Cohen-Posey
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One Book Better than the Next
Reviewed in the United States on March 11, 2018
I have been remiss in writing reviews of Yalom’s books. I became a therapist in 1973 and soon after I read THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY, 1975 and not getting enough….then read EXISTENTIAL PSYCHOTHERAPY, 1980. Last fall at a therapy training, Yalom’s... See more
I have been remiss in writing reviews of Yalom’s books. I became a therapist in 1973 and soon after I read THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY, 1975 and not getting enough….then read EXISTENTIAL PSYCHOTHERAPY, 1980. Last fall at a therapy training, Yalom’s fiction was recommended to me and lickety-split I read THE SPINOZA PROBLEM, WHEN NIETZSCHE WEPT, and THE SCHOPENHAUER CURE, each book better than the one before, but all of them splendid! I started with Spinoza because I’d always respected him for being true to himself and love historical fiction. Reading a Midrash (a story that fills in the gaps) of Spinoza’s life helped me realize that I too have a “Spinoza Problem” because I think I’ve become a therapist bereft of a “methodological” community having developed my own brand of psychotheray. WHEN NIETZSCHE WEPT gave the juicy details of Breuer’s (Freud’s mentor) life and glimpses of a young Freud, not to mention an introduction to Nietzsche and his influence on psychology. It puzzles me that many therapists, thinking Freud is passé, have no interest in studying their roots and discovering that psychoanalysis is in our DNA. And finally—THE SCHOPENHAUER CURE. I did not have a clue who Schopenhauer was and I thank Yalom for his “philosophy for dummies” books. But, will someone please tell me if Yalom is familiar with the enneagram because Philip Slate is the prefect ennea-type 5: self-sufficient, avoids intrusions, observes rather than experiences, and seeks wisdom and skills. It helped me understand a significant other in my life—also a self-sufficient type. This last book, in its modern setting with flash-backs to the 1800s made me laugh, cry out loud, and is a candidate for the best book I ever read.
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Bulent Basaran
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A tutorial on group therapy and an extensive overview of Schopenhauer''s life and philosophy
Reviewed in the United States on February 27, 2021
... yet, this book is still a page turner. A novel, and part fiction, indeed, yet the parts based on true life events are not limited to Schopenhauer''s life. Just finished reading it for the third time in about ten years. I believe I read all that Yalom wrote including his... See more
... yet, this book is still a page turner. A novel, and part fiction, indeed, yet the parts based on true life events are not limited to Schopenhauer''s life. Just finished reading it for the third time in about ten years. I believe I read all that Yalom wrote including his recent autobiography (except for his academic writings) and the wonderful, nonfiction, The Gift of Therapy.

A psychiatrist (MD) with a lifelong interest in literature, leaving the modern neurotransmitter regulating drugs to others, Yalom dedicates his life to practicing and teaching group and individual psychotherapy, the existential kind, if such a thing is admissible, and attacks with full force the varied neuroses that trouble the modern town-dweller human beings..

The stage is the living room in the main protagonist''s house with seven or eight chairs where a well functioning group meets regularly for support and therapy. Most of the action of the novel does, and indeed mostly did, happen outside, and it includes flashbacks to Schopenhauer''s life as well as a trip by one of the members of the therapy group to modern day India to the ashram of famous vipassana guru Goenka.

If you''d like to understand what goes on in the minds of many of us, how we relate, or not, to others, how we make up so much of our own suffering by keeping others away from us, and how, at the end, forgiveness, not in the common sense of pardon that assumes and accepts crime and pretends superior morality, but, in the Socratic sense, that we all do wrong when we don''t know any better, gives us everything we need, read this book. It might provide you the support group you may not have readily available and change your life. And if not, it will give you enough pointers to go and relate to everybody in your circle in a more open, authentic and healing way..
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Mid-Centurian
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book is a must for Grad Psych students!
Reviewed in the United States on April 8, 2016
Irvin Yalom. His novels have taught so many of us psychotherapists how to really listen and interact with our clients without shoving it in our faces like textbooks often do. Schopenhauer Cure is a good way to learn group psycho-therapeutic practice. Reads like... See more
Irvin Yalom. His novels have taught so many of us psychotherapists how to really listen and interact with our clients without shoving it in our faces like textbooks often do.

Schopenhauer Cure is a good way to learn group psycho-therapeutic practice. Reads like a novel (and it is) and shows that the therapist does his/her clients more good by being an integral part of the group rather than as a stone faced know-it-all. Yalom is definitely NOT a Freudian. His methodology is largely Existential/eclectic counseling. The fictional therapist in the book uses his own mortality along with a gentle but firm hand to help his beloved group help themselves. There is a newer member of the group who just doesn''t see what is going on in the sessions and the challenge for the group and the therapist is to get the newcomer, Philip, to "get it" and heal himself

This book succeeds where textbooks often fail to get graduate students to truly understand the humanity in the work that we do with and for our clients.
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RKDR
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
fairly boring
Reviewed in the United States on December 21, 2020
The book has been mostly zeroed in on group therapy conducted by a psychiatrist, which is fairly boring per se. Lack of good editing is obvious in misspelling the names of two medications: Vicodin and Synthroid, seriously? Is it that hard? Then a silly mistake in measuring... See more
The book has been mostly zeroed in on group therapy conducted by a psychiatrist, which is fairly boring per se. Lack of good editing is obvious in misspelling the names of two medications: Vicodin and Synthroid, seriously? Is it that hard? Then a silly mistake in measuring tumor as seven eighth of a centimeter. Really? Centimeter consisted of ten millimeters, so you cannot measure it in seven eights, it is not an inch. Poor editing. Refreshing aspect of the book is related to Schopenhauer, who is more interesting and realistic than the personalities of the book itself. I am going to re-read a few of his books, but doubt that I would reopen this one.
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Daniel Moscoe
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
the cure is the wound
Reviewed in the United States on June 3, 2021
Julius Hertzfeld is a therapist whose terminal cancer leaves him with about a year to live. As he racks his memory, his bookshelves, and his patient files for an answer to the question of whether he''s lived a meaningful life, he happens across his file on Philip Slate.... See more
Julius Hertzfeld is a therapist whose terminal cancer leaves him with about a year to live. As he racks his memory, his bookshelves, and his patient files for an answer to the question of whether he''s lived a meaningful life, he happens across his file on Philip Slate. Decades before, Julius attempted to treat Philip for his voracious sex addiction and failed. A meeting with Philip reveals to Julius that he''s conquered his sex addiction with a combination of philosophical wisdom--especially Schopenhauer--and total withdrawal from human relationships.

Philip''s need to support himself motivates him to become a philosophical counselor: a teacher who guides his clients through the parts of the philosophical tradition that speak to their condition. But Philip needs supervision from a licensed therapist to complete his counseling credential, and he proposes to Julius a trade: in exchange for supervision, Philip will offer Julius a course of philosophical counseling focused on Schopenhauer, which Philip thinks will alleviate Julius''s anxiety about his approaching death.

Philip offers to Julius The Schopenhauer Cure: the wisdom of Schopenhauer that Philip thinks will ease Julius''s mind. It''s the same cure that transformed Philip''s life. But Julius isn''t interested, and he sees that he can offer Philip a different kind of Schopenhauer Cure: a cure *from* the disease of Schopenhauerian isolation that has caused Philip to go twelve years without so much as sharing a meal with another person. Philip joins Julius''s therapy group in partial satisfaction of his supervision requirement, and Julius leaves open the remote possibility that he will accept guidance on Schopenhauer from Philip.

As the book proceeds we read a philosophical biography of Schopenhauer alternating mostly with group therapy sessions. Turns out, Philip *is* Yalom''s version of Schopenhauer living in late 20th Century San Francisco. This allows Yalom to explore some fascinating questions: What if Schopenhauer had had access to outstanding group therapy during his lifetime? What effect might Schopenhauer have had on those around him? What might fill the gaps in our knowledge of Schopenhauer''s life-- the parts of it that were either too painful, too shameful, or too unconscious to make it into his writing?

The gripping portraits of Philip and Schopenhauer are the best parts of the book. Those interested in the dynamics of group therapy will also find lots to dig into. But those searching for the stunning transformations in Philip to be mirrored by Julius''s growth will be disappointed. Whether he wanted it or not, Julius, and all the members of the group, *does* receive the philosophical counseling that Philip intended to offer him at their reacquaintance. But it leaves Julius''s understanding of his life, and the good human life in general, mostly untouched. Had Yalom allowed Philip to unsettle and educate Julius more deeply in his last year, this book would have reached even greater depths.
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a gentle sound
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Examined Life
Reviewed in the United States on April 5, 2011
When I started this work I had several things on my mind. Interestingly it allowed me to process them. Or some of them. I''ve confronted jarring realizations of mortality, failure in some relating, and a desire to understand or evolve aspects of myself over the past few... See more
When I started this work I had several things on my mind. Interestingly it allowed me to process them. Or some of them. I''ve confronted jarring realizations of mortality, failure in some relating, and a desire to understand or evolve aspects of myself over the past few years. That may be universal, for me it was accelerated by ill health. So I appreciate that this book of Yalom''s is about a group therapy setting, several people confronting themselves/the pending death of their leader/ in that therapy format and interestingly as counterpoint explicates Schopenhauer (and other major themes) in this author/therapist/doctors working life woven into the story quite nicely. If you read Staring at the Sun: Overcoming the Terror of Death , it seems to be written echoing that work.

Rather than summarize it, I''ll just say I appreciate his placing the therapy into a setting that allows me to understand it better-how it works- through the relationships described, with all the emotional possibility-it riveted me frankly. I kept flipping in and out of an awareness that like a dream where dreamer invents all the pieces-the book and characters all represent aspects of the author. I think that awareness of author is aided now because I''ve read several of his works, at least one with this same therapist character. I then could use this to process things having to do with my own way of dealing with grief, experiences burdening me from facing death, and in my case with guilt.
And rejection that occurred to jumble all of this, a several year old injury of heart, that intruded into a very difficult life period.

I respect the thought of a group coming together and helping one another. I have a hard time in my world imagining people as bright as these and forthright, this seems to me to be how it once was over the dynamics I run into now. But anyway they are together here to build relationships and practice for this relating in life-they are skill building in a therapy practice so that in life they can be more aware. I think the book pulls you into that process. This is facilitated by creating a therapist and his alter ego -it''s a great device he uses to write. We meet a patient this therapist Julian feels he failed in therapy years before as he sets out to consider his life through his patients and he takes on someone he is afraid he failed. Think, has he had an affect. And eventually together these two honor life.

(I knew this place of mind -my first thought growing ill of teaching was of those kids I started out with not yet skilled enough to help)

When I fell very ill a number of years ago I tried to write a text about teaching, this echoed with me as well as knowing that the person that hurt me-much like a character in the story-was one of two people I allowed to see that. Someone who never said a word to me about it except that maybe one day they''d have "time enough" to look at it. Boy, the hurt we have to process.
To capture things I''d learned and experienced was why I wrote, really to look to see if I''d had meaning in my life, as I brought to a more conscious place my fear of death, and experience of understanding it, as I dealt with medical stuff, so on.

Here I found many things echoed of that. I see through this my own ability to perceive some of the themes of life, things he has learned and is distilling as wisdom to assist you in dealing with death. Great to consider this through the book. I''m sorry to be so self referential. I believe the book invites you to that process.

I liked that in the book a woman that was wronged brings herself to tell the man who did this to her that she could have loved him, that to her -he was so beautiful. That they do, in fact, develop a relationship because they have been afforded that opportunity through some very remarkable accidents.
I learned too that sexual energy can be a response to death experiences-very helpful.

This is a quickly dashed review. The book a good story about a character, a therapist,
Yalom has written before about this thinly veiled autobiographically informed fictional therapist, graciously sharing about his own death to free us to live.
I admit it was sad to see him go.
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Christina 🙃
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Ehhh?
Reviewed in the United States on April 20, 2021
The books alright, it does get boring when they switch from characters in the book. I had to read this book for a class and was not a fan.🥺 I felt it could of been better and with the extremely short chapters and the lack of enthusiasm it made the book not worth the read... See more
The books alright, it does get boring when they switch from characters in the book. I had to read this book for a class and was not a fan.🥺 I felt it could of been better and with the extremely short chapters and the lack of enthusiasm it made the book not worth the read ☹️ It wasn’t terrible, but it wasn’t great either.
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Jorge Munoz-Bustamante
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
learn about psychotherapy
Reviewed in the United States on February 26, 2006
This book, by the great group therapist-psychiatrist Dr. Irvin Yalom, is about a famous psychiatrist, Julius, who learns that he''s dying and that he has about a year of good health left-I would''ve loved to have been a fly on the wall in one of Dr. Yalom''s groups during the... See more
This book, by the great group therapist-psychiatrist Dr. Irvin Yalom, is about a famous psychiatrist, Julius, who learns that he''s dying and that he has about a year of good health left-I would''ve loved to have been a fly on the wall in one of Dr. Yalom''s groups during the first two or three weeks that the book was released! Julius struggles with the decision of what to do and then continues to practice during the remaining year of life that he believes he has left. the characters are interesting and you definitely get a sense of the dynamics of well-run psychotherapy.

Dr. Yalom makes great use of the novel to present us with his theories regarding the role of existential issues in psychotherapy. He also does a great job of presenting psychotherapy as a long term process that is heavily dependent on the quality of interpersonal relationships, which is one of his tenets. I can see where anyone interested in psychotherapy for themselves could benefit from this experience. I could also see where students and practitioners of psychotherapy would benefit from reading this book. If I had to teach a class in psychotherapy I would denifinitely use this book. As for myself, I really enjoyed psychotherapy being presented in such a positive light.
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Top reviews from other countries

Susan Glazier
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Loved the book but is Schopenhauer so intolerable as a person as he''s painted?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 1, 2018
As usual with Yalom''s work, I was gripped from the start by this novel and read compulsively. Yalom is a master storyteller and narrator. I very much enjoyed this offering. Nevertheless, I have the feeling that the massive character assassination (contained within) of the...See more
As usual with Yalom''s work, I was gripped from the start by this novel and read compulsively. Yalom is a master storyteller and narrator. I very much enjoyed this offering. Nevertheless, I have the feeling that the massive character assassination (contained within) of the philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer is a little unfair. Yalom himself paints a picture of dedicated and supportive Schopenhauer followers including the loyal executor of Schopenhauer''s will. If Schopenhauer was so unattractive in all things (superior, isolated, extremely pessimistic, humourless and misanthropic) how come he had any followers? On finishing Yalom''s novel I downloaded the entire works of Schopenhauer on Kindle (49p) and began reading his preface to his first edition of: ''The World as Will and Idea'' (1819). I was astounded to find it contained a very good (barbed) joke that had me laughing out loud. So not so humourless then? I will keep reading and currently I''m prepared to give the bad press on Schopenhauer''s character the benefit of some doubt.
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basiluzzo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beautifully written and fascinating
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 30, 2012
A friend who shares her reading opinions with me (and I with her) recommended this book to me. I thought it was fascinating and illuminating and couldn''t put it down. The book deals with Julius, a psychotherapist, and his confrontation with his impending death, and with his...See more
A friend who shares her reading opinions with me (and I with her) recommended this book to me. I thought it was fascinating and illuminating and couldn''t put it down. The book deals with Julius, a psychotherapist, and his confrontation with his impending death, and with his last year with his intensive therapy group. I have since then started to read everything Irvin Yalom has written, which has moved me onto reading Schopenhaur and Nietzsche, which had the spin off effect of deciding to go into therapy! I recommend it to anyone who has an interest in philosophy and psychotherapy.Yalom has an easy going way of melding both which draws the non professional into the group therapy situation and its human dramas.
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shelley baldwin
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I loved it
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 18, 2020
Love this book. Insightful combination of psychology and philosophy
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Ms. L. B. Jenkins
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
''Must buy''
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 1, 2009
Having read Love''s Executioner by Yalom I was hooked on this author/therapist. The Schopenhauer Cure did not disappoint. Highly entertaining, extremely informative and a delight to read. I can hardly wait for my daily dose of reading and feel that this book needs to be on...See more
Having read Love''s Executioner by Yalom I was hooked on this author/therapist. The Schopenhauer Cure did not disappoint. Highly entertaining, extremely informative and a delight to read. I can hardly wait for my daily dose of reading and feel that this book needs to be on all recommended reading lists for anyone training or developing their counselling/therapy skills. Definitely a FIVE STAR read. (though I think I pressed 4 by mistake)
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Hadi
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 1, 2019
Yet another great boon From Irvine Yalom.
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