The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale
The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale__front

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The Joy Luck Club is one of my favorite books. From the moment I first started reading it, I knew it was going to be incredible. For me, it was one of those once-in-a-lifetime reading experiences that you cherish forever. It inspired me as a writer and still remains hugely inspirational.” —Kevin Kwan, author of Crazy Rich Asians

Amy Tan’s beloved, New York Times bestselling tale of mothers and daughters, now the focus of a new documentary Amy Tan: Unintended Memoir on Netflix


Four mothers, four daughters, four families whose histories shift with the four winds depending on who''s "saying" the stories. In 1949 four Chinese women, recent immigrants to San Francisco, begin meeting to eat dim sum, play mahjong, and talk. United in shared unspeakable loss and hope, they call themselves the Joy Luck Club. Rather than sink into tragedy, they choose to gather to raise their spirits and money. "To despair was to wish back for something already lost. Or to prolong what was already unbearable." Forty years later the stories and history continue.

With wit and sensitivity, Amy Tan examines the sometimes painful, often tender, and always deep connection between mothers and daughters. As each woman reveals her secrets, trying to unravel the truth about her life, the strings become more tangled, more entwined. Mothers boast or despair over daughters, and daughters roll their eyes even as they feel the inextricable tightening of their matriarchal ties. Tan is an astute storyteller, enticing readers to immerse themselves into these lives of complexity and mystery.

Review

"Powerful as myth." — The Washington Post Book World

"Beautifully written...a jewel of a book." —The New York Times Book Review

"Powerful...full of magic...you won''t be doing anything of importance until you have finished this book." —Los Angeles Times

"Wonderful...a significant lesson in what storytelling has to do with memory and inheritance." —San Francisco Chronicle

“This Beloved Novel Is the Kind of Book We Need Right Now. Mothers and daughters lay at the heart of Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club but in bridging the generational gap—and crisscrossing the globe—this 1989 novel imparts key lessons for forging ahead in trying times” —Martha Cheng, Wall Street Journal

The Joy Luck Club is one of my favorite books. From the moment I first started reading it, I knew it was going to be incredible. For me, it was one of those once-in-a-lifetime reading experiences that you cherish forever. It inspired me as a writer and still remains hugely inspirational.” —Kevin Kwan, author of Crazy Rich Asians

“Reading it really changed the way I thought about Asian-American history. Our heritage has a lot of difficult stuff in it — a lot of misogyny, a lot of fear and rage and death. It showed me a past that reached beyond borders and languages and cultures to bring together these disparate elements of who we are. I hadn’t seen our history like that before. At that time, we hadn’t seen a lot of Asian-American representations anywhere, so it was a big deal that it even existed. It made me feel validated and seen. That’s what’s so important about books like that. You feel like, Oh my god, I exist here. I exist in this landscape of literature and memoir. I’m here, and I have a story to tell, and it’s among the canon of Asian-American stories that are feminist and that are true to our being. It’s a book that has stayed with me and lived in me.” Margaret Cho

About the Author

Amy Tan is the author of The Joy Luck Club, The Kitchen God’s Wife, The Hundred Secret Senses, The Bonesetter’s Daughter, The Opposite of Fate: Memories of a Writing Life, Saving Fish from Drowning, The Valley of Amazement, Where the Past Begins: Memory and Imagination, and two children’s books, The Moon Lady and The Chinese Siamese Cat, which was adapted into a PBS television series. Tan was also a coproducer and coscreenwriter of the film version of The Joy Luck Club and was librettist for the opera version of The Bonesetter’s Daughter. Her essays and stories have appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies, and her work has been translated into thirty-five languages. She lives with her husband in San Francisco and New York.

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
3,881 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Charlottekrn BookfairTop Contributor: Historical Fiction Books
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beautifully Written! Beautiful Story!
Reviewed in the United States on May 9, 2017
A sensitive, multi-generational story of mothers and daughters, cousins and aunties, intertwined with the stories of the mothers as young girls in China and the conflicts and similarities of the generations. Four immigrant Chinese women, Suyuan, An-Mei, Lindo and Ying... See more
A sensitive, multi-generational story of mothers and daughters, cousins and aunties, intertwined with the stories of the mothers as young girls in China and the conflicts and similarities of the generations.
Four immigrant Chinese women, Suyuan, An-Mei, Lindo and Ying Ying, survivors of their traumatic pasts, each relate their own stories in vivid detail, in the hope of teaching their American daughters to believe in themselves and achieve a better life in America.
Having grown up in America, the daughters, Jing Mei, Rose, Waverly, and Lena, in turn relate their struggles to understand their mothers, and the cultural differences and divisions between them.
The book is descriptive, emotional, warm, and intelligent, as well as informative, Should not be missed! Recommended.
37 people found this helpful
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Pattie Meng
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
How “used” is the used book?
Reviewed in the United States on July 8, 2018
Even though the comment says it’s good and might have some highlights and notes in the book, I did not expect it to be so over written. Almost every page is occupied by notes, and it didn’t meet my expectation at all. However the book is generally clean and it’s not worn out
30 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer Jools
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Teaches you to look behind the face, the accent, and recognize that every single person is more than you will ever see......
Reviewed in the United States on December 23, 2015
I''m a huge fan of Amy Tan..... I have read all her books, have shared them, read them again, and again..... this I think was her first book (or first made into a movie), it''s been years and decided to read again and couldn''t find, so ordered and loved it so much, I got one... See more
I''m a huge fan of Amy Tan..... I have read all her books, have shared them, read them again, and again..... this I think was her first book (or first made into a movie), it''s been years and decided to read again and couldn''t find, so ordered and loved it so much, I got one for my daughter also (I''m keeping this copy for me). This is not just a story of 4 friends and their 4 daughters.... it''s the story of each mother having a history, that changed them, having friendships for decades, and how we must never assume we know it all. Four friends from China, different stories for each, and how each tries to reach their daughters who were born in America, and who have no inkling of the rich and stormy past to bring them to this place and time. Each mother is trying to reach their child, to share lessons, to help them find their Chinese side inside of them. Reminds me how a mother sees more than her child realizes.

Wonderful how Amy Tam weaves the tales from one daughter back to the mothers story, and you become invested in each of their lives. A rich and life affirming look at relationships. Loved it.

Magical !
35 people found this helpful
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Sasha S.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Keeps getting better
Reviewed in the United States on November 26, 2017
This is my third read through this book, and it just keeps getting better. The characters and stories are all relatable in some ways, and confounding in others. The breadth of experiences described in these stories means that at any point, some are directly relevant in my... See more
This is my third read through this book, and it just keeps getting better. The characters and stories are all relatable in some ways, and confounding in others. The breadth of experiences described in these stories means that at any point, some are directly relevant in my life, and others I can hardly imagine ever being true for anyone, even though I know they are. I first read this book in my early teens, and will probably read it again in a few years. I keep finding new gems in it, that I didn''t have the experience to understand on the previous read.
17 people found this helpful
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Fred M.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I confess to being a little confused on the characters from segment to segment and I think the author could have differentiated
Reviewed in the United States on April 30, 2016
If you''re looking for a plot, don''t bother. If you''re looking for character development and a description of cultural conflict between generations, this is your book. I confess to being a little confused on the characters from segment to segment and I think the author could... See more
If you''re looking for a plot, don''t bother. If you''re looking for character development and a description of cultural conflict between generations, this is your book. I confess to being a little confused on the characters from segment to segment and I think the author could have differentiated the mothers better. That having been said, it was a delightful read.
23 people found this helpful
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Donald N. Powell
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Well written, deep exploration, many themes
Reviewed in the United States on December 4, 2018
This was a deep exploration of the relations of mothers and daughters. Their ties to China and its culture are in virtually every paragraph. It is a book about women. The men do not fair so well in the prose. The pressures of filial love vs. cultural expectations are... See more
This was a deep exploration of the relations of mothers and daughters. Their ties to China and its culture are in virtually every paragraph. It is a book about women. The men do not fair so well in the prose. The pressures of filial love vs. cultural expectations are the palpable tensions. Morality, superstition, long held views of life and tradition are preened and discarded or criticized. There is a tone of cultural arrogance but tempered by primal genetic ties of longing, dreams and acceptance. It is a book with a great deal of struggle and dissatisfaction, always hinting at the power of motherhood as a form of redemption.
5 people found this helpful
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joel wing
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Culture identity and the generation gap in a Chinese American family
Reviewed in the United States on February 7, 2020
Joy Luck Club was the best-selling book by Amy Tan. It epitomized the theme which has dominated Asian American writing for decades and still does to this day: identity. Specifically Joy Luck Club discusses two conflicts. The first is about maintaining ones culture versus... See more
Joy Luck Club was the best-selling book by Amy Tan. It epitomized the theme which has dominated Asian American writing for decades and still does to this day: identity. Specifically Joy Luck Club discusses two conflicts. The first is about maintaining ones culture versus assimilating to a new country. The second was the differences between generations over what to keep of the home culture.

The story follows four older Chinese ladies who play Mah Jong together called the Joy Luck Club and their daughters. Each chapter has a theme centering around culture and the generation gap within the family.

The first chapter for example “Feathers From A Thousand Li Away” deals with how Chinese traditions and heritage shaped the lives of the mothers using a metaphor of a story about a swan one of them bought back in Shanghai, China. The bird was a duck that wanted to become a goose, which symbolized transformation and dreams of a better life. The woman took the bird to America, where she had a daughter, and wanted to pass it down to her, which meant passing her dream onto the next generation. The woman however never did that because she got caught up living in America, leaving a disconnect between the two.

The main plot starts in the next chapter where one of the mothers died and her daughter is asked to take her place in the Joy Luck Club playing Mah Jong. By reflecting upon the mother Tan tells the story of how she left China during the 1949 Revolution and came to America to escape the Communists. This also establishes a narrative style that flips between when the women were in China, later when they were in the U.S. raising their children, and then when the kids were grown up. The game also provided a link between the generations and their past and present.

As you can tell the book is heavy in symbolism. One can still read it without breaking that all down, but it definitely helps in understanding everything Tan was trying to convey.
One person found this helpful
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lmpartin
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A filling Chinese Meal
Reviewed in the United States on April 10, 2017
Amy Tan uses vignettes of different mothers and daughters going back and forth in time to tell their stories. Although at first, it was hard to keep track of who was who, Ms. Tan reveals their Chinese culture with such beauty that one can''t help but be absorbed in the... See more
Amy Tan uses vignettes of different mothers and daughters going back and forth in time to tell their stories. Although at first, it was hard to keep track of who was who, Ms. Tan reveals their Chinese culture with such beauty that one can''t help but be absorbed in the narrative. Her prose is poetic, full of symbolism, and precise. Every word counts. She brings a different world, a different culture to life with the eye of an artist painting an exotic garden.
13 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

K.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good book.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 23, 2017
This was a beautifully written book with even richer character development. Each character had such an interesting story and back story. I felt I had been picked up & placed into each life because it was so well told. There were happy moments and sad moments between the...See more
This was a beautifully written book with even richer character development. Each character had such an interesting story and back story. I felt I had been picked up & placed into each life because it was so well told. There were happy moments and sad moments between the mothers and their daughters. There are a lot of characters, and sometimes I struggled to remember who was who but I''m like that with practically any story than has more than 3 main characters. It''s my downfall. I''m glad I read this, it was interesting to read about the different cultures, and insight to how others live/lived their lives from past to present, how traditions change or how people can be shaped by the country they grow up in if it differs from their parents.
7 people found this helpful
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cherrypie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A pleasure to read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 16, 2019
An absolute pleasure to read from start to finish. Got slightly muddled with the characters but decided not to worry about that as it wouldn’t be a chore to read it again because it is so beautifully written. Looking forward to reading this authors other novels
2 people found this helpful
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Charlotte
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
unforgettable
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 7, 2018
a wonderful book-a novel which is also a kind of self help book.my most keen memory-the daughter who goes to live with her mother -previously the first, but now the second concubine to a wealthy man.when the first concubine gives the daughter a string of pearls her mother...See more
a wonderful book-a novel which is also a kind of self help book.my most keen memory-the daughter who goes to live with her mother -previously the first, but now the second concubine to a wealthy man.when the first concubine gives the daughter a string of pearls her mother crushes one with her fingers to show that it is just cheap plaster, saying " now you will learn not to be bought so cheaply..." But I think her greatest triumph is her delineation of the character of Harold-that was really something to which I could so relate
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Norma Rees
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Poignant
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 21, 2020
A. Very moving story, beautifully written Although the story was predominantly Chinese, and the description of traditions etc differs greatly from western ones, it shows that people throughout the world are more alike than different. Thank you.
One person found this helpful
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pathfinder
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good read.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 28, 2020
Bit late reading this but enjoyed it. But I have read other books that have been written since this was published and I think I enjoyed them more but I understand this was one of the first.
2 people found this helpful
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The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale

The online Joy Luck Club: discount A Novel outlet online sale