The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale__right
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale__front

Description

Product Description

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The book that sparked a revolution and inspired the hit Netflix series Tidying Up with Marie Kondo: the original guide to decluttering your home once and for all.

ONE OF THE MOST INFLUENTIAL BOOKS OF THE DECADE—CNN
 
Despite constant efforts to declutter your home, do papers still accumulate like snowdrifts and clothes pile up like a tangled mess of noodles?

Japanese cleaning consultant Marie Kondo takes tidying to a whole new level, promising that if you properly simplify and organize your home once, you’ll never have to do it again. Most methods advocate a room-by-room or little-by-little approach, which doom you to pick away at your piles of stuff forever. The KonMari Method, with its revolutionary category-by-category system, leads to lasting results. In fact, none of Kondo’s clients have lapsed (and she still has a three-month waiting list). 

With detailed guidance for determining which items in your house “spark joy” (and which don’t), this international bestseller will help you clear your clutter and enjoy the unique magic of a tidy home—and the calm, motivated mindset it can inspire.

Review

“Ms. Kondo delivers her tidy manifesto like a kind of Zen nanny, both hortatory and animistic.”The New York Times

“A literal how-to-heave-ho, and I recommend it for anyone who struggles with the material excess of living in a privileged society. (Thanks to Ms. Kondo, I kiss my old socks goodbye.) . . . To show you how serious my respect for Ms. Kondo is: if I ever get a tattoo, it will say, Spark Joy!”—Jamie Lee Curtis, Time

“This book lives up to its title: it will change your life.”—B.J. Novak, People

“This book is a cult. A totally reasonable, scary cult that works, doesn’t kill people (a bonus), but does drastically change your life. In this case — for the better.”BuzzFeed

“The most organized woman in the world.”PureWow

“The Japanese expert’s ode to decluttering is simple and easy to follow.”Vogue

“Her voice . . . is by turns stern and enchanted, like a fairy godmother for socks.”The Wall Street Journal

“Reading it, you glimpse a glittering mental freedom from the unread/uncrafted/unworn, buyer’s remorse, the nervous eyeing of real estate listings. Life’s overwhelm, conquered.”The Atlantic 

“All hail the new decluttering queen Marie Kondo, whose mess-busting bestseller has prompted a craze for tidying in homes across the world . . . one proper clear out is all you need for the rest of your life.”Good Housekeeping (UK)

“How could this pocket-sized book, which has already sold over 2 million copies and sits firmly atop the New York Times Best Seller list, make such a big promise? Here''s the short answer: Because it''s legit. . . . Kondo''s method really can change your life — if you let it.”—Today 

“Kondo challenges you to ask yourself whether each object you have is achieving a purpose. Is it propelling you forward or holding you in the past?”USA Today

“A brief and bracing practical guide to tidying up your home.”Financial Times

“[It is] enough to salute Kondo for her recognition of something quietly profound: that mess is often about unhappiness, and that the right kind of tidying can be a kind of psychotherapy for the home as well as for the people in it . . . Its strength is its simplicity.”The London Times

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.
UP NEXT
CANCEL
00:00
-00:00
Shop
Text Message
Email
Facebook
Twitter
WhatsApp
Pinterest
Share
More videos
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
26,688 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

NewYorker
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Do not waste your money!
Reviewed in the United States on September 20, 2018
Here''s what the book says: touch every item in your home and if you "love it" then keep it. If you don''t get that warm and fuzzy feeling of love, throw it away. There. Now you don''t have to read it. Seriously, de-cluttering and organizing can have a huge... See more
Here''s what the book says: touch every item in your home and if you "love it" then keep it. If you don''t get that warm and fuzzy feeling of love, throw it away. There. Now you don''t have to read it. Seriously, de-cluttering and organizing can have a huge positive impact on life. But the way this book approaches the topic is so silly and juvenile that I don''t understand why it''s a best seller. People: use your common sense and toss the things you don''t use that are cluttering up your life. Ok?
1,490 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Laura I.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Life-changing book - best $10 I''ve ever spent EVER
Reviewed in the United States on January 30, 2017
I''m somewhat of a self-help book addict. I was browsing Pinterest one day and stumbled upon the "konmari method" and was intrigued, so I bought this book for kindle and read it in about an hour. I always thought I was a very organized person (because everything I... See more
I''m somewhat of a self-help book addict. I was browsing Pinterest one day and stumbled upon the "konmari method" and was intrigued, so I bought this book for kindle and read it in about an hour. I always thought I was a very organized person (because everything I owned had a designated, labelled place and my house was always super clean), but after reading this book I realized I was nothing more than a skilled hoarder. I locked myself in my house for 6 straight weeks (seriously, only came out for absolute necessary obligations and appointments) and decluttered the ever-living hell out of my house. The only thing that slowed me down was waiting for every Tuesday to roll around when the big donation truck would come and haul off all my unwanted items, or waiting for every Monday for the trash collection. I probably discarded well over 100 bags of clutter in that 6 weeks and earned over $400 selling the big-ticket items via social media, which I used to make my house prettier. I also donated an entire trunk full of books, CDs, and DVDs to my local library. My home''s available storage used to be completely maxed out, and now I have empty drawers everywhere! I also have no less than 40 completely empty plastic storage bins in my garage that were previously full of clutter (and the storage bins are the next thing that will be sold!). Reading this book was life-changing. While I didn''t follow it to the T (I do not thank my socks for their service every day LOL), it is the best feeling in the world to look around a room and realize you love every single item in said room. I no longer feel weighed down by "stuff". I still have a few odds and ends to finish up in my house, but I''m about 90% done at this point and loving it. I never knew getting rid of things could be so addicting. I also never thought I was the kind of person who could ever throw away a photo, but by the time I got to the sentimental items category, I discarded an entire garbage can full of photos without hesitation and it felt great!
2,037 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Marc P.
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A good book that perhaps is too comprehensive in some areas and neglects others
Reviewed in the United States on February 28, 2018
First, this book has done for me what I wanted it to do: it’s helping me get rid of junk, albeit not quite in the way the author wants me to do it, but progress is progress, right? I will say the book is somewhat repetitive and it makes the same point over and... See more
First, this book has done for me what I wanted it to do: it’s helping me get rid of junk, albeit not quite in the way the author wants me to do it, but progress is progress, right?

I will say the book is somewhat repetitive and it makes the same point over and over (you have too much clutter and you’re keeping it for the wrong reasons); this might be a cold, hard, necessary teaching method to break the habit of keeping clutter, so I won’t dwell on that. On the other hand though, in areas where I wanted more detail, such as the steps she provides to actually do “decluttering”, or “tidying” as the author calls it, I found I wanted more detail. While clothing (for example) is well covered, entire categories of typical American “stuff” are left out, such as cupboards, kitchen tools, towels/linens, sporting goods, major electronic and computer gear, and the garage (and the myriad of categories of stuff found in there). There is absolutely no mention of a garage. The book, to me, is aimed heavily towards a female audience, and I’m not saying that in a sexist way. There is nothing wrong with that, it’s just a missed opportunity to be more inclusive; men have stuff too, and the vast majority (not scientifically measured, just my impression) of the examples in the book are aimed at the types of belongings women *typically* own, again please don’t take this the wrong way. Most of the client examples the author mentions are women, with perhaps only two male clients I can remember. This is only notable to the extent that many pages are spent discussing organizing purses and none spent on organizing screwdrivers. I own zero purses but lots and lots of screwdrivers (along with other tools), and they badly need organizing. But I think I’ll be able to apply the technique to my garage as well as my closet. So for any of you out there who also own screwdrivers and they are in need of organization, perhaps you’ll be in the same boat as me, wondering why your tool collection was never even mentioned.

I would like the author to focus more on suggesting *donating* the items she so desperately wants us to discard. She gives good reasons for not giving your old stuff to your family, but surely there’s a better home for unwanted clothing than the trash. I’ve made it a point to donate mine. Perhaps this type of thinking will make it into the second edition.

Finally, as the author is from Japan, some of the cited mystical benefits of “tidying up” may register as goofy to Americans. Thanking your belongings for a job well done, as she suggests, is a form of consideration which may not resonate. But this is a matter of personal preference and posture; it certainly can’t hurt but I feel all but the most committed American readers may find it a bit campy.

In any case, I did get rid of a lot of stuff on my first round, and indeed it felt good to do so. I’ve got a long way to go, but at least the author has given me a rational framework for examining an item and deciding “should it stay or should it go”. More is going than ever before.
646 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
D. Fisher, Retired Engineer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I''m Sitting Down At My Computer and Starting to Write...
Reviewed in the United States on November 23, 2018
If this the criteria to be a NYT bestseller then I should make bank! I''m am engineer and found this book to be useless. I mean, seriously? Throw out everything that doesn''t bring me joy? That''s the answer? Well, no joke. We all know that we have too much stuff and should... See more
If this the criteria to be a NYT bestseller then I should make bank! I''m am engineer and found this book to be useless. I mean, seriously? Throw out everything that doesn''t bring me joy? That''s the answer? Well, no joke. We all know that we have too much stuff and should part with it all. I thought that if I had to read one more time how the author was positively an organizational genius at age 15, I would throw that book...which didn''t bring me joy...into the trash. As for making my socks and purse happy, my socks are all cozily snugged up together by color...I am an engineer, after all...and my purse feels it is its honored duty to protect its precious traveling companions...the wallet, the inhalor, etc... 24/7.

I, unfortunately, learned some great lessons about parting with too much stuff 8 months ago when my hoarder mother passed away. I bought 120 large trash bags and with a determined ruthlessness, I tossed out 3 tons of trash. Boxed up new stuff for donation. Held estate sales for things of value...which Ms. Kondo does not seem to address very well. I thought that I would gain some insight from this book about purging my own messy house. I don''t want to do to my kids what mother did to me. However, this book was no help. As someone else suggested, don''t waste your time reading the entire book. Just read the sentences in boldface print. Honestly, that''s all that should have been printed but there wouldn''t be much money in selling a brochure.
517 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
JavaBarista
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I followed the book''s instructions and threw it out.
Reviewed in the United States on January 4, 2019
According to the author''s philosophy, you should only keep things that bring you joy. So I threw this book out.
452 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Eats Paste
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Way better than you''d expect given some of the nasty commentary.
Reviewed in the United States on March 25, 2016
I bought this because the simple-living bug has been biting me lately. I''m not cluttery but I do have a lot of stuff, you know? It''s not just laying out in heaps; it all has a ''place'', but I''ve realized I just want less of it. This book seemed to be very well-liked,... See more
I bought this because the simple-living bug has been biting me lately. I''m not cluttery but I do have a lot of stuff, you know? It''s not just laying out in heaps; it all has a ''place'', but I''ve realized I just want less of it.
This book seemed to be very well-liked, and to offer a different approach than the standard home organization book.

Boy howdy.

I''ll be honest and say I''m NOT following her system exactly, because some of it is physically not possible for me. But even not doing EXACTLY what she said, I can tell you it''s a better approach than all these other organization/decluttering books.
You know, most of the gurus just have ideas on how to store your stuff. It never occurs to them to ask, instead of just telling you about cool boxes and bins to buy, well...do you really NEED all that stuff in the first place? Or, if they DO recommend getting rid of stuff, it''s along the old if-you-haven''t-used-it-in-X-time-lose-it line. But what happens is you still have a bunch of stuff you don''t REALLY LIKE. Yeah, I wear this skirt four times a year, so according to the rule of have-you-used-it-in-the-last-year, I should keep it. But what if I only wear it four times a year because it isn''t very flattering? Or it''s scratchy? Wouldn''t I be better off getting rid of it in favor of some other skirt I''ll wear every two weeks because it IS a flattering cut?

I notice lots of folks putting this book down because that''s ''no big revelation''. ''Uh, you need someone to tell you to only keep stuff that you like having around and keep it put away?''
Yeah, lots of people DO need someone to remind them that''s okay. Don''t even TRY to act like there''s NOTHING in your house that you only have because someone gave it to you and you feel like they''re expecting to see it or you''d feel guilty getting rid of it, or it was your great-great-grandmother''s and it''s an HEIRLOOM,or you spent good money on this and dang if you''re gonna get rid of it till you''ve got your ''money''s worth'' out of it, etc etc. That is FAR more common than ''I only have things in my house that I WANT to see/use''.

And I''ll tell you too, the whole thing about you needing to physically touch everything to make that decision is true. I have NOT followed her recommendation of pulling every single thing in a given category together to go through it, although I can see the sense of that. You have to know what ya got and how many before you can make educated decisions about how much storage space you need. So you get every piece of clothing you have, every book in the house, etc. I haven''t been able to do that. My garage is FULL OF BOXES. Going through every one to find any clothes that might be lurking in there, then going through them again to root out any books lurking in there, and so on for every category? Not gonna happen, sorry.
I''ll do the books in the garage when I get to the garage. But in, say, the library, the advice to actually pick up each book and hold it DID help. The first time I just looked at each shelf. Yeah, I still want that. Still want that. Eh, I don''t need that one. Oo, I still want all these. But later on, when I did it AGAIN and actually picked up every book, I ended up with THREE BOOKCASES'' worth that I was totally OK parting with. Not three shelves. Three bookcases. I mean, I discovered I had four copies of the same book. (I rebuy books because I lose track; I have several thousand). I did NOT NOTICE when I was just eyeballing them that there were four of the same. It''s like your mind just stops seeing things it''s used to seeing, a common phenomenon. Do what she suggests and physically lay hold of your stuff!

That brings me to the other thing people are really dumping on her about...her suggestion that you talk to your stuff while you''re holding it and thank it for its service.
Some of you, first of all, are extremely small-minded. ''Talking to inanimate stuff is bats#$%''...? It depends on what culture you''re coming from. Here, yes, for the most part that is odd behavior. (Don''t pretend that you''ve never yelled at your car or your printer or your phone, on the other hand. Do you actually think it understands you or will respond differently if you speak harshly to it? No? Then why do you bother?)
Unfortunately for your crack theory, the author of this book is NOT from a Western culture. It''s pretty obvious she''s Shinto, or was at one time, and for them, objects are NOT inanimate. They DO have a ''spirit'' of a certain kind. That doesn''t make her cray-cray, it just means she''s not American. Jeez. I mean, Native Americans thought that rocks and rivers and clouds and such things had a life, a spirit, as well. And we all think of them as being a wise, knowledgeable people, with a connectedness to the world that we don''t have.

If it offends your religion to thank a coat before you send it on, then direct your commentary to your God of choice instead. What she''s really getting at is BEING THANKFUL, and if you have a problem with that, there''s something wrong with YOU, not her. Pick up the coat. Say out loud or in your head: "God/Allah/Zeus, thank you for blessing me with this coat, and now I''m going to share the blessing...I know You''ll get it to someone who will benefit...thanks for everything You do for me''. Fold it up, put it in the donation bag. Easy. Her religion involves thanking the object itself, your religion involves thanking the deity who sent the object your way, everyone''s happy. It''s not that complicated, for pete''s sake.
It''s a GOOD thing to be more mindful of what you have. It causes you to a) become more careful about what you bring into your life, and b) to take better care of your stuff. What''s wrong with that? Nothin''.

So basically, while I have to say that in most Western households, where we have more square footage than the average Japanese house,some of what she says is physically impractical/impossible, and I certainly haven''t followed her system to the letter, it DOES have useful things to say and I have found it to be of benefit even in an abridged, half-#$$ form.
If you are in a place/frame of mind where you''re ready to let go of the stuff that our houses are saddled with, cluttering up our minds, check it out.
788 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Susannah
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If Only I Could Give This Book Zero Stars
Reviewed in the United States on January 6, 2019
I truly hate everything about this silly book, and yet I gave the author the courtesy of actually reading the whole thing, well beyond the point where she finally totally lost me. She lost me at books, and the idea that books are merely paper and printed words. NO! Books... See more
I truly hate everything about this silly book, and yet I gave the author the courtesy of actually reading the whole thing, well beyond the point where she finally totally lost me. She lost me at books, and the idea that books are merely paper and printed words. NO! Books reflect an owner''s lifetime of aspiration and curiosity and study and knowledge. They reflect how we see ourselves. The ones read before are cherished as part of one''s history, the date(s) when read perhaps noted on the front page. They hold vivid memories of who we were when we first read or acquired them. The last ones I''d ever discard are the ones I''ve already read, unless of course I found them as inane as Ms. Kondo''s book. I get the idea of "sparking joy," and I understand that there are people so overwhelmed by junk that they can''t figure out where to begin, but for others of us, happiness and memories are embedded in our possessions, and would be lost in the absence of them. Some of us are collectors. Some have saved for a lifetime as the historians of our lives. The goal of such lives is to surround ourselves with cherished possessions and enjoy them, not to sip herbal tea of an afternoon with nothing to look at but a bouquet of flowers -- the ideal state of being Ms. Kondo holds out. Ms. Kondo says she wants to enable readers to decide what to keep, but in fact her method of piling every book or stitch of clothing in one place is designed to shame people into discarding, and she really doesn''t care where it goes. Mountains of waste for landfills are just fine as long as they leave the house. At least to this reader, advocating turning possessions into waste withing making a serious effort to sell or donate the best of them is irresponsible. We all should be free from guilt packing things away so that they may "spark joy" another day, or simply find new utility when our lifestyles change again. I refuse to engage in a war on possessions as though happiness can come only in the absence of them. I can''t wait for this fad to pass.
270 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
K. Wilcox
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
We get it Marie Kondo, you think you are amazing
Reviewed in the United States on August 13, 2017
This book is crap. The author feels the need to keep bringing up the fact that she is, apparently, the perfect organizer. She talks about herself entirely too much, and once I got the part about getting rid of all of my books I was like, "NOPE!" I understand her... See more
This book is crap. The author feels the need to keep bringing up the fact that she is, apparently, the perfect organizer. She talks about herself entirely too much, and once I got the part about getting rid of all of my books I was like, "NOPE!" I understand her concept that you should throw away anything that doesn''t make you feel happy when you touch it, but some of her ideas are ridiculous. Get rid of most of your seasonal clothes and only keep things that can be worn year-round? I live in Maine. It gets cold in the winter and hot in the summer, so explain to me what I''m supposed to wear. I had heard some pretty good things about the Kondo Method of cleaning and I just wanted to declutter my house a bit so I bought this book, but I feel ripped off. This was not the one for me.
319 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Killer Robot from the future
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Let me save you time and money
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 26, 2018
Throw away what you don’t need or love. When you use something, put it back where it belongs afterwards. There, in 2 lines I have told you all the advice this book has to offer. Honestly don’t waste your money, it’s a con.
480 people found this helpful
Report
.
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
DOES THIS BOOK SPARK JOY?
Reviewed in India on August 7, 2018
The writer asks us to hold each item in our possession in our hands and ask this question - Does it spark joy? If it doesn''t, then discard it. I bought this book on several recommendations. But I should have asked myself if the thought of reading it sparks joy before buying...See more
The writer asks us to hold each item in our possession in our hands and ask this question - Does it spark joy? If it doesn''t, then discard it. I bought this book on several recommendations. But I should have asked myself if the thought of reading it sparks joy before buying it. This is the biggest take-away from this book. Now I find myself asking this question whenever I go shopping. If the thought of eating it, wearing it, doing it, doesn''t spark joy, it''s time for reflection. And that''s it. The rest of the book is minutiae of how to discard and store things according to the Kon-Marie method which the writer invented which reads like a self-praising professor who gives boring lectures on how his past students did extremely well due to his teaching methods and how other teachers aren''t that good or effective. The irony is that this book is for hoarders but hoarders would never pick up this book. Or even if they pick it up, they would just pick it up to hoard it and not to read it. Or to read it and never follow through it. And if you are thinking of gifting it to someone you think has a hoarding problem, forget it. Hoarding is a psychological issue and unless the person navigates and cleans rubbish off their mental recesses, reading this book is just another dump in the ocean of mental junk. The gist of the book: - Take up cleaning the whole house (or universe) at one go! This probably won''t work if you live in a joint family with your kids and parents and parents-in-law because you''ll have to spare a week or two for it- on your own without interruption. - Discard anything that doesn''t spark joy. (Alas, I have bought things when I was younger and stupider and I have no spare monies to buy them again.) But this book maybe the one to go. - Sort things by category, not by location. Example, if you are sorting the clothes, then sort ALL the clothes in your house at once, not just in one cupboard. (This is great, but I have all my stuff in their exact location already) - Then the rest of the book is about how to store items in a cupboard (for which if you follow the book, you might need new cupboards with more drawers and clothes that don''t wrinkle), how to clean the bathroom, how to arrange things in the kitchen, how to sort papers and documents and books, how to let go of gifts you do not use, etc. etc. etc. etc. till you get bored of reading the book about cleaning and decide to get rid of boredom by watching a movie and the idea of cleaning goes out of your brain and into the same vacuum of universe you were trying to clean. (P.S. I read the whole book) NOT RECOMMENDED FOR: - People who already follow a routine cleanup of their stuff. For example, I have decided I''m only going to keep a certain number of clothes in my cupboard. I buy clothes ONLY when they get worn out or stop fitting. I do not buy clothes every Diwali or even for any close family member''s wedding. Anything unused for 5 years has to go. - People who are quite organized or like organizing tactics like DIY storage solutions. This book is against storage solutions and instead focuses on discarding. - People suffering from some form of Obsessive Compulsive Disorders- we guys are already doing great at cleaning. No need to bend ourselves double and ruin our lives over it by reading one more book on it. - People looking for an idea on minimalist living. This book is not about minimalism. I thought it was so - going by the white cover with the word ''Japan'' on it. But that is why we shouldn''t judge a book by it''s cover and people by their home-organizing techniques. RECOMMENDED FOR: - People who like window shopping. - People who go shopping whenever there is a ''sale''. - People who ''have to have'' something when they see something on a store window. - People who have a hard time discarding things out of guilt or any sentimental value. - People who have other people (usually mothers or wives or domestic help) to clean and organize things for them. - People who have overflowing wardrobes and bookshelves. - People whose lives are out of order (in existential crisis of some sort). So I held this book in my hand after reading it and asked myself - Does this book spark joy? Hell no. It is a very easy read, but like a boring chemistry textbook unless you are really interested in the subject. [I bought a paperback copy of the book. The font and binding are good.]
322 people found this helpful
Report
Alex
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Addressing some common concerns...
Reviewed in Canada on May 24, 2018
After reading the one star reviews of this book out of morbid curiosity, it seems there are three main complaints people have, and I''d like to address them as the basis of my review: 1) "I can''t get over how she anthropomorphizes socks, treating them as if they have...See more
After reading the one star reviews of this book out of morbid curiosity, it seems there are three main complaints people have, and I''d like to address them as the basis of my review: 1) "I can''t get over how she anthropomorphizes socks, treating them as if they have feelings and need to rest. This woman is out of her mind!" Some people seem to be very hung up on the metaphors in this book. When Marie Kondo talks about socks (and other objects) working hard all day and requiring a proper rest when they’re put away, she doesn’t mean this literally. The point of all the anthropomorphizing in the book is to encourage you to think about your belongings differently and treat them with respect. For example, it’s easy to throw clothes on the floor of your bedroom or stuff them in a drawer thoughtlessly, but if you pause to consider what your clothes actually do for you and the value they bring to your everyday life, you’re far more likely to treat them with care and put them neatly back where they belong. Marie Kondo wants you to be grateful to your possessions, not for the sake of your possessions, but for your own! 2) "She doesn''t explain how to deal with [specific category of items]. This book is worthless!" One of the primary tenets of the Konmari method is the belief that only YOU can decide which things to keep and which to throw away. Your own feelings, desires, and values are the litmus test for each item. Which belongings do you want to surround yourself with? Which belongings bring value to your life? Marie Kondo can’t answer these questions for you, and that’s the point! The book encourages you to take responsibility for your possessions, and, through the “celebration” of tidying, take control of them too. If you want/need some additional instruction on the tidying and storing process, I’d recommend her second book, Spark Joy, which breaks the broad categories mentioned in this book into more manageable sub-categories, and has more in-depth tips for storing items once you’ve decided what to keep. 3) "It''s far too difficult to pull everything from one category out of storage all at once. I don''t have time to do something like that!" If you’re looking for a “quick fix” to your clutter problem, one where you can go at it Saturday morning and finish by Sunday evening, this is not the book for you. From her descriptions of past clients, it could take up to a year for someone to completely tidy their home, depending on the number of items they own and the difficulty they have in recognizing which items “spark joy”. As a single woman living in a one-bedroom condo with not many belongings to begin with, it may only take me a few weeks, but if you’ve got a two-story house and family of four, you’d better prepare to be in this for the long haul. Of course, the reward for this massive investment of time and effort is the Konmari guarantee that you will have finished tidying once and for all, and your house will never return to its original cluttered state! I don’t know if this book has changed my life yet (I’m still in the process of tidying up!) but it has absolutely changed my mindset and my relationship to my belongings. It’s had enough of an effect on me that I’ll gladly proselytize about it to anyone who will listen! Check it out!
269 people found this helpful
Report
joss40
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Bonkers!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 22, 2019
Hello socks, good job today, let me roll you up and stand you vertically in my drawer. New clothes? Be sure to cut the umbilical cord from the shop (aka the price tag) so that they truly belong. Kitchen utensils rattling around in a drawer? Use a shoe box lid, shoe box lids...See more
Hello socks, good job today, let me roll you up and stand you vertically in my drawer. New clothes? Be sure to cut the umbilical cord from the shop (aka the price tag) so that they truly belong. Kitchen utensils rattling around in a drawer? Use a shoe box lid, shoe box lids are great for almost anything. Handbags, empty out every night and let them rest, they derserve a break. Stand everything vertically, oh sorry did I already mention that. Roll your tights up and stand them vertically in a swirl , much like the socks I mention fifty pages ago oh yes and don’t forget, bin everything and recycle nothing. Throw it all away, you don’t need it. Terrible book, that doesn’t quite describe how bad it is, you almost have to buy it to believe it!
98 people found this helpful
Report
Jo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mind blown!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 3, 2018
The best book I have read by far! I received a special offer from Amazon and thought....cover looks nice, I''ll maybe read it at some point. Few weeks later I was bored and decided to give it a go. Well, I haven''t put it down, my house is now exceptionally tidier and...See more
The best book I have read by far! I received a special offer from Amazon and thought....cover looks nice, I''ll maybe read it at some point. Few weeks later I was bored and decided to give it a go. Well, I haven''t put it down, my house is now exceptionally tidier and logically organised making me feel more confident, happy and focused. Even whilst in work I''m finding myself more productive as I''m clearing my workspace, carrying less items and feeling focused. I get things done more quickly, after all there are less items to clean, my house fees brighter and practical. I''ve told everyone I know about the book and they didn''t believe me until they too read the book. I would recommend this if you are looking to develop a respectful relationship with items or have difficulty letting things go and it changes your cleaning , organising and tidying perspective. I no longer feel any guilt donating items that no longer make me happy. If you''ve landed on this book, chances are you are curious, but it, it''s amazing.
81 people found this helpful
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Explore similar books

Tags that will help you discover similar books. 16 tags
Results for: 
Where do clickable book tags come from?
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • getting out
  • cleaning house
  • arts management
  • top business books
  • big house

TIDYING UP WITH MARIE KONDO SPARK JOY LIFE-CHANGING MAGIC JOURNAL THE LIFE-CHANGING MANGA OF TIDYING UP KIKI & JAX
More reads to spark joy on your bookshelf! A beautifully packaged box set of the books that inspired Netflix’s Tidying Up with Marie Kondo. An illustrated master class on the art of organizing and tidying up. A gratitude journal to help you reflect on what sparked joy in your life today. A graphic novel that will teach you the KonMari Method. A picture book about the life-changing magic of friendship.

Product information

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying lowest Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and new arrival Organizing outlet online sale