Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale
Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale__after

Description

Product Description

From the bestselling author of The Devil in the White City, here is the true story of the deadliest hurricane in history.

National Bestseller


September 8, 1900, began innocently in the seaside town of Galveston, Texas. Even Isaac Cline, resident meteorologist for the U.S. Weather Bureau failed to grasp the true meaning of the strange deep-sea swells and peculiar winds that greeted the city that morning. Mere hours later, Galveston found itself submerged in a monster hurricane that completely destroyed the town and killed over six thousand people in what remains the greatest natural disaster in American history--and Isaac Cline found himself the victim of a devastating personal tragedy.

Using Cline''s own telegrams, letters, and reports, the testimony of scores of survivors, and our latest understanding of the science of hurricanes, Erik Larson builds a chronicle of one man''s heroic struggle and fatal miscalculation in the face of a storm of unimaginable magnitude. Riveting, powerful, and unbearably suspenseful, Isaac''s Storm is the story of what can happen when human arrogance meets the great uncontrollable force of nature.

Review

“A gripping account ... fascinating to its core, and all the more compelling for being true.” — The New York Times Book Review
 
“Gripping ... the Jaws of hurricane yarns.” — The Washington Post

"The best storm book I''ve read, consumed mostly in twenty-four hours; these pages filled me with dread. Days later, I am still glancing out the window nervously. A well-told story." —Daniel Hays, author of My Old Man and the Sea

" Isaac''s Storm so fully swept me away into another place, another time that I didn''t want it to end. I braced myself from the monstrous winds, recoiled in shock at the sight of flailing children floating by, and shook my head at the hubris of our scientists who were so convinced that they had the weather all figured out. Erik Larson''s writing is luminous, the story absolutely gripping. If there is one book to read as we enter a new millennium, it''s Isaac''s Storm, a tale that reminds us that there are forces at work out there well beyond our control, and maybe even well beyond our understanding." —Alex Kotlowitz, author of The Other Side of the River and There Are No Children Here

"There is electricity in these pages, from the crackling wit and intelligence of the prose to the thrillingly described terrors of natural mayhem and unprecedented destruction. Though brimming with the subtleties of human nature, the nuances of history, and the poetry of landscapes, Isaac''s Storm still might best be described as a sheer page turner." —Melissa Faye Greene, author of Praying for Sheetrock and The Temple Bombing

"Superb…. Larson has made [Isaac] Cline, turn-of-the-century Galveston, and the Great Hurricane live again." — The Wall Stret Journal

"Erik Laron''s accomplishment is to have made this great-storm story a very human one —thanks to his use of the large number of survivors'' accounts—without ignoring the hurricane itself." — The Boston Globe

"Vividly captures the devastation." — Newsday

"This brilliant exploration of the hurrican''s deadly force...tracks the gathering storm as if it were a character…. Larson has the storyteller''s gift of keeping the reader spellbound." — The Times-Picayune

"With consumate narrative skill and insight into turn-of-the-century American culture…. Larson''s story is about the folly of all who believe that man can master or outwit the forces of nature." — The News & Observer

"A powerful story ... a classic tale of mankind versus nature." — The Christian Science Monitor

From the Inside Flap

September 8, 1900, began innocently in the seaside town of Galveston, Texas. Even Isaac Cline, resident meteorologist for the U.S. Weather Bureau failed to grasp the true meaning of the strange deep-sea swells and peculiar winds that greeted the city that morning. Mere hours later, Galveston found itself submerged in a monster hurricane that completely destroyed the town and killed over six thousand people in what remains the greatest natural disaster in American history--and Isaac Cline found himself the victim of a devestating personal tragedy.
Using Cline''s own telegrams, letters, and reports, the testimony of scores of survivors, and our latest understanding of the science of hurricanes, Erik Larson builds a chronicle of one man''s heroic struggle and fatal miscalculation in the face of a storm of unimaginable magnitude. Riveting, powerful, and unbearably suspenseful, Isaac''s Storm is the story of what can happen when human arrogance meets the great uncontrollable force of nature.

From the Back Cover

September 8, 1900, began innocently in the seaside town of Galveston, Texas. Even Isaac Cline, resident meteorologist for the U.S. Weather Bureau, failed to grasp the true meaning of the strange deep-sea swells and peculiar winds that greeted the city that morning. Mere hours later, Galveston found itself submerged by a monster hurricane that completely destroyed the town and killed over 6,000 people in what remains the greatest natural disaster in American history -- and Isaac Cline found himself the victim of a devastating personal tragedy.

Using Cline''s own telegrams, letters, and reports, the testimony of scores of survivors, and our latest understanding of the science of hurricanes, Erik Larson builds a chronicle of one man''s heroic struggle and fatal miscalculation in the face of a storm of unimaginable magnitude. Thrilling, powerful, and unrelentingly suspenseful, Isaac''s Storm is the story of what can happen when human arrogance meets the uncontrollable force of nature.

About the Author

ERIK LARSON is the author of four national bestsellers: In the Garden of Beasts, Thunderstruck, The Devil in the White City, and Isaac''s Storm, which have collectively sold more than 5.5 million copies. His magazine stories have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic Monthly, Harper''s and other publications and his books have been published in fourteen countries.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

TELEGRAM
Washington, D.C.
Sept. 9, 1900
To: Manager, Western Union
Houston, Texas

Do you hear anything about Galveston?
        
Willis L. Moore,
        
Chief, U.S. Weather Bureau

The Beach
September 8, 1900

Throughout the night of Friday, September 7, 1900, Isaac Monroe Cline found himself waking to a persistent sense of something gone wrong. It was the kind of feeling parents often experienced and one that no doubt had come to him when each of his three daughters was a baby. Each would cry, of course, and often for astounding lengths of time, tearing a seam not just through the Cline house but also, in that day of open windows and unlocked doors, through the dew-sequined peace of his entire neighborhood. On some nights, however, the children cried only long enough to wake him, and he would lie there heart-struck, wondering what had brought him back to the world at such an unaccustomed hour. Tonight that feeling returned.
        
Most other nights, Isaac slept soundly. He was a creature of the last turning of the centuries when sleep seemed to come more easily. Things were clear to him. He was loyal, a believer in dignity, honor, and effort. He taught Sunday school. He paid cash, a fact noted in a directory published by the Giles Mercantile Agency and meant to be held in strictest confidence. The small red book fit into a vest pocket and listed nearly all Galveston''s established citizens--its police officers, bankers, waiters, clerics, tobacconists, undertakers, tycoons, and shipping agents--and rated them for credit-worthiness, basing this appraisal on secret reports filed anonymously by friends and enemies. An asterisk beside a name meant trouble, "Inquire at Office," and marred the fiscal reputations of such people as Joe Amando, tamale vendor; Noah Allen, attorney; Ida Cherry, widow; and August Rollfing, housepainter. Isaac Cline got the highest rating, a "B," for "Pays Well, Worthy of Credit." In November of 1893, two years after Isaac arrived in Galveston to open the Texas Section of the new U.S. Weather Bureau, a government inspector wrote: "I suppose there is not a man in the Service on Station Duty who does more real work than he. . . . He takes a remarkable degree of interest in his work, and has a great pride in making his station one of the best and most important in the country, as it is now."
        
Upon first meeting Isaac, men found him to be modest and self-effacing, but those who came to know him well saw a hardness and confidence that verged on conceit. A New Orleans photographer captured this aspect in a photograph that is so good, with so much attention to the geometries of composition and light, it could be a portrait in oil. The background is black; Isaac''s suit is black. His shirt is the color of bleached bone. He has a mustache and goatee and wears a straw hat, not the rigid cake-plate variety, but one with a sweeping scimitar brim that imparts to him the look of a French painter or riverboat gambler. A darkness suffuses the photograph. The brim shadows the top of his face. His eyes gleam from the darkness. Most striking is the careful positioning of his hands. His right rests in his lap, gripping what could be a pair of gloves. His left is positioned in midair so that the diamond on his pinkie sparks with the intensity of a star.
        
There is a secret embedded in this photograph. For now, however, suffice it to say the portrait suggests vanity, that Isaac was aware of himself and how he moved through the day, and saw himself as something bigger than a mere recorder of rainfall and temperature. He was a scientist, not some farmer who gauged the weather by aches in a rheumatoid knee. Isaac personally had encountered and explained some of the strangest atmospheric phenomena a weatherman could ever hope to experience, but also had read the works of the most celebrated meteorologists and physical geographers of the nineteenth century, men like Henry Piddington, Matthew Fontaine Maury, William Redfield, and James Espy, and he had followed their celebrated hunt for the Law of Storms. He believed deeply that he understood it all.
        
He lived in a big time, astride the changing centuries. The frontier was still a living, vivid thing, with Buffalo Bill Cody touring his Wild West Show to sellout crowds around the globe, Bat Masterson a sportswriter in New Jersey, and Frank James opening the family ranch for tours at fifty cents a head. But a new America was emerging, one with big and global aspirations. Teddy Roosevelt, flanked by his Rough Riders, campaigned for the vice presidency. U.S. warships steamed to quell the Boxers. There was fabulous talk of a great American-built canal that would link the Atlantic to the Pacific, a task at which Vicomte de Lesseps and the French had so catastrophically failed. The nation in 1900 was swollen with pride and technological confidence. It was a time, wrote Sen. Chauncey Depew, one of the most prominent politicians of the age, when the average American felt "four-hundred-percent bigger" than the year before.
        
There was talk even of controlling the weather--of subduing hail with cannon blasts and igniting forest fires to bring rain.
        
In this new age, nature itself seemed no great obstacle.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
4,118 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Thrilled2Pieces
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Didn''t want it to end!
Reviewed in the United States on January 21, 2017
I loved Devil in the White City by Erik Larson, but was disappointed by In The Garden of Beasts and Thunderstruck. I seem to have been on a weather disaster kick for a while, so I ordered Isaac''s Storm. This is one of those books that is so good, you don''t want it to... See more
I loved Devil in the White City by Erik Larson, but was disappointed by In The Garden of Beasts and Thunderstruck. I seem to have been on a weather disaster kick for a while, so I ordered Isaac''s Storm. This is one of those books that is so good, you don''t want it to end--in fact, when I finished it, I started reading it again immediately. The research, the intrigue, the drama---way better than a novel for me, because this all happened. In the two other Erik Larson books I mentioned, it appears he got bogged down in the details of one of the dual plots and though you knew they were related to each other, by the time you got to the end, you didn''t much care about the people involved. In Isaac''s Storm, you''ll even care about the prelude to the hurricane of raining frogs. Usually, when I "loan" a book to somebody, I don''t care much if I get it back or not. This one has my name in it!
86 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
chauvesouris
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
History Awakened
Reviewed in the United States on September 24, 2016
I don''t need to repeat the story-line here as other reviewers have done so. All I can add is that this book, especially when it gets to the storm itself and its incredible impact, held me spellbound. Larson is brilliant at presenting history as it can be: remarkable... See more
I don''t need to repeat the story-line here as other reviewers have done so. All I can add is that this book, especially when it gets to the storm itself and its incredible impact, held me spellbound. Larson is brilliant at presenting history as it can be: remarkable stories that are not a long list of "name/place/date" but an exploration of situation, connections, character, emotion, outcomes - fact, not fiction, with sources noted, of course - that draw one in and keep one immersed through to end. After reading a "history" by another author (different subject entirely) I longed for Larson''s exploration of same, knowing that I would care more, remember more, and understand the connections that drive events more than the endless drivel of who begat whom, etc.(often only good for source material, it seems). Imagine what Larson''s writings on the French Revolution, St. Bartholomew''s Day Massacre, the Boer War - oh, anything - would be. He takes an event and builds the world around that event - and one leaves his arena with a deeper understanding of the world he explores than few others can or do provide.
106 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
A RochesterTop Contributor: Cooking
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Man still fails to predict weather.
Reviewed in the United States on October 7, 2018
I have read all of Larson''s books. He writes well . This is my least favorite of all his books. It is the story of the nearly complete devastation of Galveston, Texas by a hurricane, a hurricane that was predicted to be a normal day. A portion of the book was concerned... See more
I have read all of Larson''s books. He writes well . This is my least favorite of all his books. It is the story of the nearly complete devastation of Galveston, Texas by a hurricane, a hurricane that was predicted to be a normal day. A portion of the book was concerned with facts about weather and the mystery and lack of knowledge about this subject. The dissension and personal animosity within the weather organization was discussed extensively. I found these facts to be boring. Maybe the word is complicated not boring. Weather is complicated and hard to understand for those of us who have little to no knowledge about the subject.

Finally, the story emerged, when the book switched to the fierce storm, and the damage and loss of life. This part of the story was well done. Not many people could write the horrifying story of such death and destruction. It was real, and the reader was "THERE".
I find todays weather warnings to be overdone and often misleading. People sometimes choose not to evacuate because the predicted storm often becomes a breezy day. In the contest between man and weather -weather wins.
34 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Anthony(Tony) Riggio
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Hurricanes, Gulf of Mexico, Galveston Texas, Weather forecasting, Bureaucratic Blunders.
Reviewed in the United States on August 3, 2015
A Review by Anthony T. Riggio of “Issac''s Storm” by Erik Larson, 8-3-15 I have read most of Larson''s books on historical events and have never been disappointed. Issac''s Storm brought home to me the destructive power of a hurricane and the fact that we are... See more
A Review by Anthony T. Riggio of “Issac''s Storm” by Erik Larson, 8-3-15

I have read most of Larson''s books on historical events and have never been disappointed. Issac''s Storm brought home to me the destructive power of a hurricane and the fact that we are blessed today by superb forecasting technology and tracking of storms. Living by the Gulf of Mexico, I am always anxious when a storm of any kind, is forecasted by the National weather services, and our local weather people. I have lived through several category 1 storms. I built my house to withstand up to a category 4 storm and possibly a category 5. I would not sit out a storm forecasted at a 2 or higher.

In the case of Issac''s storm in 1900, that hit Galveston, Texas, it was estimated to be close to a category 5. at that time the National Weather Service was a budding and infant service dependent on oral relays of information from ships at sea or island in the Caribbean, specifically Cuba and other smaller Islands. Ship to shore telegraph was still too new to be of help leaving word of mouth by the sea captains. once information was obtained about a gathering storm, appropriate warnings were supposed to be communicated to the residents of the probable impact sites.

Unfortunately, politics always comes into play especially with a budding service whose reputation was at risk and its confidence by the public and the need for funding. The National Weather Service had weather reporting stations at storm vulnerable locations throughout the United States and representatives were constantly communicating barometric, temperature and wind calculations to the Weather Service''s headquarters in Washington. Because of both politics and funding issues the word "hurricane" was forbidden to be communicated because of the variable shifts in weather fronts.

Forecasting was more of an art than a scientific prediction. The weather chief in Galveston was both and educated weather person as well as being a physician. His name was Issac Cline and he sensed the coming storm but was on delicate territory in expressing the need for greater danger to the residents of Galveston whose topography was only about five feet above sea level and while local politicians talked about a sea wall because of previous storms, the idea was put into a bureaucratic filing drawer.

Erik Larson lays out a compelling story based on his usual and extensive research and puts the reader into the minds of the characters in the book, which were all real people. The reader will feel the growing tensions of the arriving storm and feel the wind, rain and flood of
Galveston. The reader will feel pity for Issac Cline and disgust for his bosses in Washington DC.

Normally because of our up to the minute forecasting and tracking of hurricanes we feel great comfort and have the time and ability to prepare and evacuate if necessary. The number of casualties and deaths as described by Larson are shocking and good and bad of humanity is clearly demonstrated. l

In those days they did not "name" storms and I suppose the author named it Issac''s storm because of his responsibility as a employee of the National Weather Bureau and the amount of personal blame that would be open to public criticism. The book was well written and I highly recommend it to those who enjoy history presented, as Larson so skillfully does in each of his works. I do not hesitate to award five stars to this work.
64 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Steven M. AnthonyTop Contributor: Fantasy Books
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Short History of the 1900 Galveston Hurricane
Reviewed in the United States on June 22, 2020
I’ve read several of Erik Larson’s non-fiction works and have always found him to be educational and entertaining. This book, focuses on the Galveston hurricane of 1900, the largest natural disaster in American history, killing over 6,000 people. The book is told largely... See more
I’ve read several of Erik Larson’s non-fiction works and have always found him to be educational and entertaining. This book, focuses on the Galveston hurricane of 1900, the largest natural disaster in American history, killing over 6,000 people. The book is told largely through the eyes of the National Weather Service station agent in Galveston at the time, Isaac Cline.

As you can imagine, weather forecasting, at the turn of the 20th century, was in its infancy, especially as regards tropical storms and hurricanes. The 1900 Galveston hurricane hit a Texas coast that was completely unprepared, at least partially as a result of conflict between American and Cuban weather services.

Unbeknownst to me, Galveston was one of the most prosperous cities in the United States at the time of the hurricane, eclipsing its next-door neighbor, Houston, as the port of choice for the region. The hurricane largely destroyed the city and allowed Houston to supplant Galveston for regional supremacy.

The story has many interesting tidbits, not just as relates to Galveston and the hurricane, but also the formation and early operation of the National Weather Service and previous posting held by Cline.

The book is rather short and contains a few silly exaggerations, such as claiming that Cline registered a temperature of 134 degrees one summer in Amarillo, and that a raging flood resulted from an upstream hailstorm in the same area, due solely from melting of the hail stones. It also claims storm surges of over 30 feet for the Galveston Hurricane, which certainly seems unlikely.

All in all, a short entertaining read, but not exceptional.
3 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Mal Warwick
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A hurricane deadlier than Katrina
Reviewed in the United States on August 2, 2016
Isaac’s Storm is a detailed account of a massive hurricane that struck the coast of Texas in September 1900. The storm wreaked havoc across a wide swath of the country but devastated one city in particular. In Larson’s words, “Galveston became Atlantis.” The... See more
Isaac’s Storm is a detailed account of a massive hurricane that struck the coast of Texas in September 1900. The storm wreaked havoc across a wide swath of the country but devastated one city in particular. In Larson’s words, “Galveston became Atlantis.”

The deadliest hurricane in history?

The book’s subtitle refers to the unnamed storm as “the Deadliest Hurricane in History,” but that’s far from true. Individual cyclones (simply another name for hurricanes) that have struck the coast of Bengal and Orissa in northeastern India (and now Bangladesh) have killed as many as 100,000 people. Several have felled tens of thousands in modern history. The storm that virtually destroyed Galveston in 1900 caused fewer than 10,000 deaths (probably no more than 8,000). In truth, then, “Isaac’s storm” was the deadliest only in US history. But publishers have a way of dramatizing books’ content with sensational titles. Clearly, they sell more books that way.

Galveston today is a city of fewer than 50,000 inhabitants, but in 1900 it “stood on the verge of greatness. If things continued as they were, Galveston would soon achieve the stature of New Orleans, Baltimore, or San Francisco. . . [T]hey were in a winner-take-all race against Houston, just fifty miles to the north.”

Who was Isaac, and why was it his storm?

The Isaac of the title was Dr. Isaac M. Cline, the chief weatherman in Texas. He was also a physician specializing in the effects of weather on human health. Isaac had risen through the ranks of the Weather Service because he had proved to be one of the most diligent and perceptive forecasters in the bureau. In the years following the Galveston hurricane, Isaac spoke and wrote widely about having saved thousands of lives by warning of the danger before the most destructive waves hit the city. In fact, as Larson makes clear, he did no such thing. However, he had indeed perceived that a storm was coming, and even defied orders from Washington to spread the word. Unfortunately, he had no clue that the storm was a hurricane that would blast through Galveston with sustained winds of 180 miles per hour and gusting to more than 200 miles per hour.

In Isaac’s Storm, Larson skillfully intersperses a sketch of Isaac’s life with a detailed portrait of the hurricane. Originating in Western Africa and making its way across the Atlantic to the Caribbean, the storm had gathered such force that Cuban meteorologists identified it as a hurricane shortly after it arrived in the region. Sadly, the director of the US Weather Service was a racist and obsessed with control, and he had prevented the Cuban forecast from being transmitted because he thought the Cubans inferior. Later, the director went even further, refusing to acknowledge Isaac’s warnings about the coming storm. (In years afterward, the director shamelessly claimed loudly and often that he had actually issued warnings about the devastating storm.)

About the author

Erik Larson is unquestionably one of the most talented and accomplished nonfiction authors at work in the US today. He is probably best known for his runaway bestseller, The Devil in the White City, which won numerous awards, including an Edgar in 2004.
13 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Dee ArrTop Contributor: Harry Potter
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Real-Life Thriller!
Reviewed in the United States on July 8, 2019
I’ve read a few of Erik Larson’s other books and found “Isaac’s Storm” to be the best. The author leads us through the chapters, laying the necessary groundwork while building up to the ferocity of the hurricane that ravaged Galveston in September of 1900.... See more
I’ve read a few of Erik Larson’s other books and found “Isaac’s Storm” to be the best. The author leads us through the chapters, laying the necessary groundwork while building up to the ferocity of the hurricane that ravaged Galveston in September of 1900.

Numerous characters are introduced (not so many that it gets too confusing) and the events that brought them to Galveston are explained. We also learn the history of the Weather Bureau, and the politics that constrained its forecasters. Mr. Larson fills the pages with interesting stories and amusing anecdotes, filling the chapters in-between with a timeline of the hurricane, how it began and the path taken on its way to Galveston.

Isaac Cline is the man for whom the book is named, and we learn his strengths and his foibles. When the storm finally arrives, the author relates many tales of horror and death, of survival and misery. The author backs up his story with an incredible amount of detailed research, recorded in the Notes and Sources sections.

I had little previous knowledge of this event in history, and this book easily filled in the gap. Even though the actual storm stories are a smaller part of the book, the chapters leading up to it are filled with fascinating historical information that I had never known. This turned a non-fiction book into a page-turner. Five stars.
3 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Mac
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disappointing
Reviewed in the United States on November 21, 2020
I really tried to like this book but it just didn’t work for me. The history of the weather bureau? Very dry stuff. The author pulls together disparate facts about obscure people but I never felt connected to the characters. The author was trying to provide historical... See more
I really tried to like this book but it just didn’t work for me. The history of the weather bureau? Very dry stuff. The author pulls together disparate facts about obscure people but I never felt connected to the characters. The author was trying to provide historical context for the impending disaster but in my opinion it didn’t result in a cohesive narrative. Rather you get the feeling he didn’t have enough source material and opted to fill in the obvious cracks with disjointed factual tidbits and suppositions. I have enjoyed the author’s other books but I would suggest that you avoid this one.
4 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Ovekat
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A storm of a book!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 25, 2017
Another great book from Erik Larson which I thoroughly enjoyed.
Report
Maryh
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Erik Larson excels again
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 7, 2015
Excellent book
One person found this helpful
Report
johnfench81
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 13, 2016
Good book
Report
lyntrom
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting True Story
Reviewed in Canada on September 12, 2021
I liked the way that this author depicted from the personal perspective, how this dreadful hurricane evolved for the people of Galveston with little or no prediction of how serious a storm this was. By telling this story through the events faced by some of Galveston''s...See more
I liked the way that this author depicted from the personal perspective, how this dreadful hurricane evolved for the people of Galveston with little or no prediction of how serious a storm this was. By telling this story through the events faced by some of Galveston''s residents, the shocking reality of what happened became more real to the reader. After finishing the book and looking for images on the web of the destruction, how anyone survived to tell the tale is hard to believe. An amazing story!
Report
David
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A gripping account of the force of nature
Reviewed in Canada on October 5, 2018
At this time when we are hearing of so many hurricanes and other natural disasters it was salutary to read this account of a massive storm and the havoc it wreaked in 1900. The arrogance of the US weather service boggles the mind. It is hard to put this book down,...See more
At this time when we are hearing of so many hurricanes and other natural disasters it was salutary to read this account of a massive storm and the havoc it wreaked in 1900. The arrogance of the US weather service boggles the mind. It is hard to put this book down, especially as one relates its story to present day disasters. It made me more conscious of the insignificance of man (and woman) compared to the power latent in the universe. It is literally a terrific read and I thoroughly recommend it.
2 people found this helpful
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

More items to explore

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • corpus christi texas
  • non fiction adventure books
  • apple books
  • state of texas
  • texas history biographies
  • non-fiction historical books

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale

Isaac's high quality high quality Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History online sale